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7 Spooky Places Inside And Outside Manila

This Halloween season, why not take a one-of-a-kind trip to these scary spots?

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Photography: Wikipedia (Main Photos)

Halloween is coming up, and when better to hear scary stories than during this season? Aside from doing a marathon of your favorite horror movies, a great way to spend Halloween can be by visiting these places in and beyond the metro which are said to house scary spirits. Why not pay these scary spots a visit and see for yourself if the stories are really true?

Manila City Hall

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Did you know that the seat of the local government of Manila has a reputation for being haunted? Employees say that apparently, you shouldn’t stay inside beyond 6 PM, because that is when the spirits inside the building start to make their presence felt. One entity said to be residing in the structure is that of a man who allegedly hung himself in the city hall’s clock tower. Another spooky thing about the Manila City Hall, which was built in 1941 then heavily damaged during World War II, is that if viewed from above, it is shaped just like a coffin with a cross on it.

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Manila Film Center

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This building, located near the Cultural Center of the Philippines in Pasay City, is well-known for its sad, eerie history. Part of former First Lady Imelda Marcos’ desire to make the Philippines a film capital of the world, the structure was built during to serve as the venue for the Manila International Film Festival. However, it was marred by a gruesome accident: In November 1981, during the wee hours of dawn, the building scaffolding collapsed, causing hundreds of workers to fall into the concrete, which had not yet dried completely. The Marcos administration is said to have ordered concrete poured over the bodies—some of whom were said to still be alive—to complete the building in time. Since then, several spooky encounters have been reported to occur in the building, such as wailing and moaning voices, footsteps, and even apparitions of bodies partly buried in the concrete.

Bellarmine Hall, Ateneo De Manila University

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At over a hundred years old, the Ateneo campus in Katipunan, Quezon City has its fair share of paranormal stories. One building in Ateneo that is said to be haunted is Bellarmine Hall. One of the reasons why many Ateneans dislike having classes in this building because it is located far away from the other buildings in the campus. Another reason is its alleged host of ghostly entities. Some students have reported that when passing by Bellarmine Hall at night, they would see a woman in white standing on the third floor, waving at them; apparently, you need to wave back, because if you don’t, she will show up right in front of you. There are also stories claiming that the soul of a deceased Jesuit priest still roams the corridors of Bellarmine Hall.

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Benitez Hall, University of the Philippines – Diliman

With its abundance of aged buildings, UP Diliman is also known for its number of spooky stories. One of its oldest structures, Benitez Hall, is believed to be haunted by a deceased dean whose portrait hangs on the building’s walls. Apparently, the artist who painted that portrait mixed the dean’s ashes with the paint, and at night the dean would leave the painting and roam around Benitez Hall, even observing and attending practice lectures of new teachers. Some also say that the souls of comfort women who were taken advantage of by Japanese soldiers during the war still roam around inside this building.

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Malacañang Palace

Another majestic and well-known building in Manila is the Malacañang Palace, which is the home of the President of the Philippines. But aside from being rich with cultural and historical significance, the Palace is regarded as a haunted place, with numerous stories about entities manifesting themselves there. From ghosts of former presidents, to sightings of a headless guard and a black-clad woman looking out over the Pasig River, to a kapre said to be residing in the balete tree by the state entrance of the structure, Malacañang Palace seems to be more than just the symbol of the national government.

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Mt. Cristobal

In the province of Laguna, you will find Mt. Cristobal, situated beside the famous Mt. Banahaw. Despite it being a popular hiking spot, Mt. Cristobal gained the nickname “Devil’s Mountain” due to supposed paranormal events occurring there. One story surrounding this place is that of a couple who was said to have gone hiking there at night. On their way back to their campsite, they ended up taking an unusual trail which turned out to be deadly, and after that, nobody ever found them again. This story and the many other stories involving Mt. Cristobal has caused many to say that those who want to hike there should never go alone, or they might end up getting lost and losing control of their minds.

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Laperal White House

If you are planning a visit to Baguio soon and are looking for an interesting place to visit, you might want to check out the Laperal White House. Though it now houses the Bamboo Carving Gallery, it is still believed to be haunted. Formerly owned by the Laperal clan in the 1920s, the mansion was converted into a temporary garrison by Japanese soldiers during the Second World War, and was therefore witness to many gruesome killings and acts of torture. Until now, apparitions are rumoured to still be manifesting there, such as that of a young girl standing motionless on the staircase fronting the house, and a woman staring out one of the house’s glass windows.

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