Array
Building & Renovating

5 Tips For Taking Care of A Family Home

Maintaining a mid-century property can be easy with this handy guide

Shares
Original Article: Bubbles Salvador Photography: Michael Angelo Chua (Main Photo)

There's nothing quite like living in a mid-century family home—nothing can replace the happy memories you've made in it, the sentimental value of the property being owned by the family for generations and how it stands out among more modern structures.  

According to architect Ivy Tablante-Darilag of Structura Architects, and hertiage conservation expert Manuel Singson, "A house built [in the 1950s] would have been designed with clean, linear silhouettes, and a great consideration for incorporating nature into the structure." Living in a mid-century abode is ideal for those who prefer homes with a straightforward design and passive cooling solutions. 

If you happen to own or inherit a place like this, consider yourself lucky—but that doesn't mean there's no work involved as far as maintaining it is concerned. What kind of maintenance does this kind of home require? Here's a quick guide: 


ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

1. Conduct a thorough visual assessment of all portions of the house regularly. Do this at least every six to 12 months. "This will allow you to identify possible problems even before they occur, like exposed surfaces, structural members (beams, columns and stairs), electrical wiring and plumbing," Ivy explains. 

2. If possible, refer to as-built plans of the house. This will allow you to trace locations of unseen fixtures such as pipes and columns embedded on walls, among others. 


ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

3. Focus your maintenance work on materials used on exposed surfaces (e.g. walls, ceilings, window frames, flooring, eaves, roof) if the structural frame is intact. 

4. Strip off paint from certain portions to assess the condition of the surface material. Wood and steel are considered "sensitive" materials and should be checked thoroughly before repainting or refinishing. 


ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW

5. Steel should be checked for corrosion. If steel used for structural components (trusses, columns, beams, stairs) has corroded, replacement might be necessary. Concrete is a more stable material and requires less maintenance. 

This snippet originally appeared in the July 2017 issue of Real Living Magazine. 

More on Realliving.com.ph

Shares

Latest Stories

How You Can Achieve a More Efficient Kitchen Without Remodeling!

All you need to do is organize your kitchen items and establish specific zones.

10 Pretty Decor Pieces for an Insta-Worthy Wall

Make the most of your bare walls!

How to Pack a Suitcase Efficiently, Prevent Wrinkled Clothing

Especially if you're just bringing a carry-on!

7 Ways to Make Your Ceiling Look Higher Than It Actually Is

Take note of these decorating tricks to help you create the impression of a taller room.

Replacing This Home Appliance May Help You Save on Electricity

Sometimes, oldies are not necessarily goodies.

Decorate Your House on a Budget! Learn From These Real Homes

Refreshing the look of your home doesn't require spending lots of money!

How to Fake Natural Light When Your Home Doesn't Have a Lot of Windows

Avoid dark, heavy window treatments and keep furniture away from windows.

A Look Inside Baby Baz Go's Playroom

Hand-painted details and captivating colors complete the room's whimsical woodland theme

10 Storage Ideas to Organize a Cluttered Bathroom

You don't need to stop at just shelves and baskets when organizing your bathroom.

A Filipino Family Based in Dubai Shares How Living With Less Made Them Happier

Minimalism is not just about having a clutter-free home, says the mom. It's also about having peace of mind.

There's a Secret Trick to Keeping a Small Kitchen Neat and Clean

Many of us instantly think it's difficult to work in a small kitchen.

How to Live With Less? Stop Buying Things Just Because It's on Sale for Starters

The journey toward minimalism can be challenging, but it will be worth it.
Load More Stories

Get inspiring design ideas and handy hints.
Subscribe to our newsletter now!